Which is the Best Cover Image?

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19 Responses to Which is the Best Cover Image?

  1. kaggsysbookishramblings says:

    Image wise I like the first one – but the colour of the lettering doesn’t quite gel for me!

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    • Jeff says:

      Thanks for your feedback! The lettering is a knocked-up placeholder that uses colour to be legible against the illustration. The actual lettering will also be illustrated. It’s a good sign that you don’t like the placeholder then!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Jonathan says:

    I can’t decide between 2&3 but definitely not 4. I’d have the author’s name on a single line though.

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    • Jeff says:

      Interesting point about a single line. I just looked and the current client sample has both the title and name on one line, quite small, and with the illustration boxed off. The basis of the preferred design was from a book by one of the author’s favourite writers. It’s against my interests but I will suggest that the design has no illustration. This would fit with the author’s minimal and conceptual style. Or is that a bit French, something that the UK/US book market has little time for?

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sarah says:

    I prefer the balance of image 1, but the title doesn’t stand out enough against it. Image 2 works the best as a backdrop to the title/author, but so much of the image’s power and fragility is lost in that. I’d go for image 1 but change the title/author colours. The Title should be something bolder and brighter and author colour lighter. 🙂

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  4. Jeff says:

    Hi Sarah – see my reply to kaggsy above about the text. I agree about titles standing out. I’ve always felt put off by the huge author names on bestsellers. There’s something egotistical about it. Good to see objections to the text placeholders here. The trick is, though, how to get the illustrated versions doing the job without raising new objections!

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  5. cherylmoore says:

    It’s between 1 and 2 for me.

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  6. Stefanie says:

    Don’t like 4 at all. It comes down to 1&3 and I lean toward 3 because it has an old-timey sort of not quite finished photo-like quality if that makes any sense!

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  7. Me, I prefer number 2. It’s much easier to read but perhaps that’s just the resolution on my screen.

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  8. Ste J says:

    I wanted to say one as it is the cleanest image but the author and title don’t stand out so much, the happier medium then is two with it’s slightly less decisive image albeit one that still works and a clearer wording.

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    • Jeff says:

      Pretty much the consensus. In the end, the author has gone for a blank cover and a line drawing as a frontispiece.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ste J says:

        Nothing like a bit of simplicity and a good clean cover to get the punters in.

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        • Jeff says:

          People usually like plenty of options to choose from, but this author kept professing confusion. So I cut the visuals back to very little. The white space and a frontispiece respectively have a minimalism and old-fashioned quality that together reflect the nature of the prose (which is sparing and rather 1930s-1940s European in style). Have 4 more books to typeset, including a Spanish translation. Don’t know about the punters yet. No idea if they’ll be self-published or sent out to publishers.

          Liked by 1 person

  9. Thom Hickey says:

    No 3 clear winner for me! Thom

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